Protecting yourself

Protecting yourself It used to be that, in Israel, we’d only see in-car cameras in racing, both to provide thrilling footage for fans and to document and analyze crash situations. Motorcyclists began using helmet cameras for the same reasons. Dash cameras are also popular with police forces, to provide a clear record of traffic stops. It’s only natural then that there’d be a rise in regular consumer use

Most dashboard cameras simply record the view through the car’s windshield. They have a fixed amount of digital storage and when the storage is full, they recycle the data by overwriting the oldest files. These cameras hold several hours of footage, with the exact time window generally depending on the video quality of the camera and the amount of memory installed. Thus, if a front-end crash occurs, the camera’s got it covered.

More advanced dash cameras include features like GPS tagging to show the exact location, date, and time of each recording, as well as the vehicle’s speed. Advanced cameras also include speed-based driving modes that record differently when the car is moving and when it is stopped, as well as Wi-Fi and cellular connectivity options for video uploads. Regardless of features,

the core function of a dashboard camera is to provide an impartial record of what the driver could see in the moments leading up to an accident. A dash camera can prove that you had a green light, or that the other driver blew through a stop sign before hitting you. Being able to show impartial evidence helps avoid “your word against the other driver” situations after an accident.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *